Med One to One Summer/Fall twenty twenty-two ISSUE 72

PUT IN THE WORK

Written By: Troy Tait

I have what I would term as a “love-hate” relationship with the game of golf. It is a sport that I have played for years, and I have even had a few rounds where I actually played well. But for the most part, I play more for the enjoyment of being outside and taking a nice walk while looking for my ball in lakes, walking through trees, or even walking in the sand.

Recently, I encouraged my wife to start playing. We started going out hitting balls last fall and have been playing a couple of rounds each week for the last several months. While she has made great progress with her game, she has also gained an appreciation for my “love-hate” relationship with golf.

On a recent golf outing, we were playing behind a group of individuals who were clearly in the early stages of their golf experience. As we followed them from hole to hole, my wife made an interesting observation. This group was playing “from the tips.” For those who are not familiar with golf, there are several locations— called the tee box—where you start on each hole. They are identified by some type of marker, usually with a different color for each location. In this case, the colors on the course were black, blue, white, and red with black being the furthest back and red the closest.

The different tee boxes allow for a different experience, giving those who have played a lot the opportunity to challenge themselves by playing the tees in the very back. Those who are just starting out, generally play from the front tees—making the hole a little easier.

As we played our round, the group became more and more frustrated and didn’t seem to be enjoying the game at all. We questioned to ourselves, why would they play from the “tips” and make the game more difficult. As the round continued and we were close to the end, through conversation with them and hearing them talk to one another, it became very apparent as to why they chose to play from the back tees. They thought playing there would make them better.

While I admire their dedication to improve their game, simply playing from the “tips” was not the answer to becoming a better golfer. In order to improve, they would need to put in the work. That might mean they would need to start on the front tees and work their way back. They would also need to spend time at the range hitting balls and spending time on the practice green.

GOLF IS A LOT LIKE LIFE—BOTH OUR PERSONAL LIFE AND BUSINESS LIFE—THERE ISN’T AN EASY SHORTCUT. IF WE WANT TO BE SUCCESSFUL, WE MUST PUT IN THE WORK.

Golf is a lot like life—both our personal life and business life—there isn’t an easy shortcut. If we want to be successful, we must put in the work. We can’t just show up and play from the “tips” and think that effort alone will lead to success. It takes time and requires a consistent effort. Even when we think we have attained a desired level, there is always a next level to work towards. Just like the game of golf, we will never reach perfection but we can keep working hard to improve every day.

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